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Making Work Work

2021-23 Theme
Join us in exploring the social and economic organization of work and its transformation, with a focus on vulnerable workers and an eye toward policy changes that better protect individuals and families. 

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Events
 

Oct 19
Gig Economy: Predatory Platforms, Precarious Work 6:30 p.m.

Featuring Juliet Schor, 2022-23 Wayne Morse Chair.  Juliet Schor is an economist and sociologist at Boston College whose research focuses on work, consumption, and climate...
Gig Economy: Predatory Platforms, Precarious Work
October 19
6:30–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center 175

Featuring Juliet Schor, 2022-23 Wayne Morse Chair. 

Juliet Schor is an economist and sociologist at Boston College whose research focuses on work, consumption, and climate change. Her most recent book is a collaboration titled After the Gig: how the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back (2020), which won the Porchlight Management and Workplace Culture Book of the Year. Schor is a cofounder of the Center for a New American Dream, the South End Press, and the Center for Popular Economics. 

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politic's 2021-23 theme, Making Work Work. 

Videos of recent events

Book Launch and Conversation with Sarita Gupta and Erica Smiley

A Path Forward for Working Oregonians?

How Policy and Enforcement Shape Unsheltered Homelessness in Lane County

Fighting for Democracy: From Ukraine to the U S Senate and Voting Rights

View more videos on our YouTube channel

News

Check out KLCC's  Wayne Morse Project Grant-funded series, Workin' It. So far, stories have focused on the challenges and changes in farmwork in Oregon and apprenticship programs, as well as what it means to start a new business during the pandemic. The series is in conjunction with the Wayne Morse Center's 2021-23 theme, Making Work Work.

This year, a record 81 students will participate in Wayne Morse Center programs for UO undergraduates, graduate students, and law students. 

In conjunction with the Wayne Morse Center's Making Work Work theme of inquiry, the Eugene Weekly has published the first story in a series exploring the labor movement in Oregon during a global pandemic. The story focuses on the community benefits bidding program, which allows public agencies to only accept construction bids from contractors paying living wages and full time benefits.

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