Events

Mar 6
Democracy: The Challenges Ahead, with Rep. Peter DeFazio 5:30 p.m.

Join us for the annual Wayne Morse Chair lecture featuring Representative Peter DeFazio, 2023-24 Wayne Morse Chair.  Rep. DeFazio served for 36 years as the U.S....
Democracy: The Challenges Ahead, with Rep. Peter DeFazio
March 6
5:30–7:00 p.m.
Ford Alumni Center Giustina Ballroom

Join us for the annual Wayne Morse Chair lecture featuring Representative Peter DeFazio, 2023-24 Wayne Morse Chair. 

Rep. DeFazio served for 36 years as the U.S. Representative for Oregon’s 4th congressional district, making him the longest-serving member of Congress in Oregon history.

Congressman DeFazio chaired the influential House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which has jurisdiction over highways and transit, ports and water resources, railroads, aviation, economic development, and the Coast Guard. Among his many accomplishments as committee chair, he increased federal investment in America’s infrastructure by more than $550 billion. 

Rep. DeFazio previously served as the ranking member on the House Natural Resources Committee, where he focused on energy, federal lands, ocean and fisheries, and Native American issues. A native of Massachusetts and a veteran of the United States Air Force Reserve, he previously was a county commissioner in Lane County.  

Rep. DeFazio voted against and refused to accept every congressional pay raise while the government was deficit spending. Instead, he used his pay raises to fund scholarships at five southwestern Oregon community colleges.

Apr 11
The New Town Hall: Building a Communications Platform for Democracy noon

Featuring Kevin Esterling, Professor and Chair of Political Science at UC-Riverside. Esterling directs the Laboratory for Technology, Communication, and Technology at...
The New Town Hall: Building a Communications Platform for Democracy
April 11
noon
William W. Knight Law Center 110

Featuring Kevin Esterling, Professor and Chair of Political Science at UC-Riverside. Esterling directs the Laboratory for Technology, Communication, and Technology at UC-Riverside, developing new technology to advance more constructive, informed, and inclusive public communications.

Apr 25
Race, Rights, and Rifles: The Origins of the NRA and Contemporary Gun Culture 12:15 p.m.

 Featuring Alexandra Filindra, associate professor of political science and psychology at University of Illinois Chicago.  Filindra's new book Race,...
Race, Rights, and Rifles: The Origins of the NRA and Contemporary Gun Culture
April 25
12:15–1:45 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center 110

 Featuring Alexandra Filindra, associate professor of political science and psychology at University of Illinois Chicago. 

Filindra's new book Race, Rights, and Rifles examines the ties between American gun culture and white male supremacy from the American Revolution to today. 

Although many associate gun-centric ideology with individualist and libertarian traditions in American political culture, Race, Rights, and Rifles shows that it rests on an equally old but different foundation. Instead, Alexandra Frilindra shows that American gun culture can be traced back to the American Revolution when republican notions of civic duty were fused with a belief in white male supremacy and a commitment to maintaining racial and gender hierarchies.

Drawing on wide-ranging historical and contemporary evidence, Race, Rights, and Rifles traces how this ideology emerged during the Revolution and became embedded in America’s institutions, from state militias to the NRA.

Alexandra Filindra specializes in American gun politics, immigration policy, race and ethnic politics, public opinion, and political psychology. Filindra received her Ph.D. from Rutgers University and served as a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University’s Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions and the Center for the Study of Human Development. The author of more than 30 peer-reviewed articles, Filindra has received research grants from the University of Illinois Chicago, the Pew Center for the States, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Rhode Island Foundation. She is the recipient of three best paper awards from the American Political Science Association and the Lucius Barker Award from the Midwest Political Science Association. 

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series and is free and open to the public. Pizza will be available for attendees. 

May 2
Morse Bookmarks: How the Heartland Went Red 12:30 p.m.

Stephanie Ternullo, assistant professor in the government department at Harvard, will discuss her new book, How the Heartland Went Red: Why Local Forces Matter in an Age of...
Morse Bookmarks: How the Heartland Went Red
May 2
12:30–2:00 p.m.
Gerlinger Hall Gerlinger Lounge

Stephanie Ternullo, assistant professor in the government department at Harvard, will discuss her new book, How the Heartland Went Red: Why Local Forces Matter in an Age of Nationalized Politics.

 How the Heartland Went Red shows how place informs Americans’ partisan attachments through a comparative study of three White, postindustrial cities during the 2020 presidential election. The book argues that we can best understand the reddening of the American Heartland by examining how local contexts have sped up or slowed down White voters’ turn toward the right.

 

May 9
Anita Hill: Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 6:00 p.m.

The 2023-24 Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties will be presented by award-winning author, educator, and lawyer Anita Hill. The talk will explore what this...
Anita Hill: Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
May 9
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Straub Hall 156

The 2023-24 Lorwin Lecture on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties will be presented by award-winning author, educator, and lawyer Anita Hill.

The talk will explore what this committed feminist fighter has learned from her advocacy around issues of gender violence and the perils and promises our current moment holds for "feminist futures." 

Hill is a professor of social policy, law, and women’s studies at Brandeis University. Hill’s most recent book is Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence (2021), which is a University of Oregon Common Reading selection for 2023-24.

This is a concluding event to the year-long 50th anniversary celebrations of CSWS and is presented in partnership with the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics. It is cosponsored by the UO Division of Equity and InclusionOregon Humanities Center, and Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation.

Jun 3
Chasing Hope: A Reporter's Life, featuring Nicholas Kristof 6:00 p.m.

Nicholas Kristof,  New York Times columnist, Pulitzer Prize winner, and best-selling author, will give a talk based on his new book.  Since 1984, Nicholas...
Chasing Hope: A Reporter's Life, featuring Nicholas Kristof
June 3
6:00–7:30 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center 175

Nicholas Kristof,  New York Times columnist, Pulitzer Prize winner, and best-selling author, will give a talk based on his new book. 

Since 1984, Nicholas Kristof has worked almost continuously for The New York Times as a reporter, foreign correspondent, bureau chief, and now columnist, becoming one of the foremost reporters of his generation. Here, he recounts his event-filled path from a small-town farm in Oregon to every corner of the world. Reporting from Hong Kong, Beijing, and Tokyo, while traveling far afield to India, Africa, and Europe, Kristof witnessed and wrote about century-defining events: the Tiananmen Square protests and massacre, the Yemeni civil war, the Darfur genocide in Sudan, and the wave of addiction and despair that swept through his hometown and a broad swath of working-class America. 

Kristof writes about some of the great members of his profession and introduces us to extraordinary people he has met, such as the dissident whom he helped escape from China and a Catholic nun who browbeat a warlord into releasing schoolgirls he had kidnapped. These are the people, the heroes, who have allowed Kristof to remain optimistic. Side by side with the worst of humanity, you always see the best.

Kristof is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times, where he was previously bureau chief in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Tokyo. He is the coauthor, with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, of five previous books: TightropeA Path AppearsHalf the SkyThunder from the East, and China Wakes. He was awarded two Pulitzer Prizes, one with WuDunn in 1990 for their coverage of China, and the second in 2006 for his columns on Darfur.

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's 2023-25 theme of inquiry, Defending Democracy. A book signing will follow the event, and books will be available to purchase.