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The Scholars provides skills building, service learning, and leadership training to UO sophomores and juniors interested in public affairs and community engagement. 

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Events 

Apr 29
The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson1:00 p.m.

Alondra Nelson is deputy director for science and society in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. She is also president of the Social Science Research...
April 29 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Alondra Nelson is deputy director for science and society in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. She is also president of the Social Science Research Council and the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. She was previously a professor of sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science.

Nelson is author of several books, including The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome. She has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality and about the social implications of new technologies, including artificial intelligence, big data, and human gene editing.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center’s Science, Policy and the Public theme of inquiry and cosponsored by UO Black Studies and Minor Program. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series and the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

Register for this free event.

May 4
Historicizing Covid-19: Challenges and Questionsnoon

Register for this free online event The Covid-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented attention to the work of historians of medicine and public health. Journalists from around...
May 4 noon–1:30 p.m.

Register for this free online event

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented attention to the work of historians of medicine and public health. Journalists from around the world have asked these scholars to provide "lessons from history" as nations and governments have tried to contain and control the pandemic. Providing neat, helpful lessons has been challenging because historians’ answers are often far from simple. In this talk, Evelynn Hammonds will discuss the difficulties of offering historical examples that can capture the complex forces that shape all epidemics.

Evelynn Hammonds is chair of the Department of the History of Science and professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard. She is the author of Childhood's Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diphtheria in New York City, 1880–1930 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) and has published articles on the history of disease, race and science, African American feminism, African American women and the epidemic of HIV/AIDS, and analyses of gender and race in science and medicine. Her current work focuses on the intersection of scientific, medical, and socio-political concepts of race in the United States.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. Cosponsored by the UO Black Studies and Minor Program, History Department, and Global Health Minor Program. 

News

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers kids a chance to experience the museum virtually through their Explore from Home program, which is supported by a Wayne Morse Center Project Grant.

The Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics mourns the passing of Rennard Strickland, former dean of University of Oregon School of Law and staunch supporter of the mission of the Wayne Morse Center.

Current Wayne Morse Scholar Sumit Kapur and recent Wayne Morse Scholar Sravya Tadepalli have been selected as finalists for the prestigious Rhodes scholarship. Read the story

more news

Videos of recent events

Reproduction and Genetic Technologies panel discussion

Can Science Make Sense of Life?, featuring Sheila Jasanoff

History of Scientific Racism and Eugenics panel discussion

Designer Babies: All You Ever Wanted to Know (and More), featuring Françoise Baylis

The State from Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities, featuring Vesla Weaver

View more videos on our YouTube channel

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