Program for Democratic Governance

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Program for Democratic Governance

The Program for Democratic Governance supports scholarly inquiry and educational programming on democratic institutions, behavior, and dilemmas. Begun in 2008 by Philip H. Knight Chair and founding Director Daniel Tichenor, the program is home to the Center’s Public Affairs Speaker Series (PASS) and Wayne Morse Scholars.

Wayne Morse Scholars

Wayne Morse Scholars is a program for undergraduate students interested in public policy, governance, and activism. All current UO students (not incoming freshman) are eligible to apply. Applications will be available in the spring. 

Learn more

 

Public Affairs Speaker Series upcoming events

Aug 16
A New Woman: Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration & Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver

In the fall of 2021, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon will open A New Woman — Clara Barck Welles, Influence and Inspiration in Arts...
A New Woman: Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration & Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver
October 9–2
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

In the fall of 2021, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon will open A New Woman — Clara Barck Welles, Influence and Inspiration in Arts and Crafts Silver, focusing on the artistic work, career, and feminist social activism of one of the nation’s most noteworthy early 20th century artisans and entrepreneurs. Showcasing works in the collections of the JSMA and the Portland Art Museum, together with rarely exhibited pieces from select private collections, the show will be on view at the JSMA through October 2, 2022. It will be accompanied by a publication including essays by noted scholars of American Arts and Crafts metalwork, Sharon S. Darling and Darcy L. Evon.

Clara Barck Welles has long been recognized as the founder and owner of the Kalo Shop of Chicago, famous for its elegant Arts and Craft silver hollowware, flatware, and jewelry. Under her tutelage, the Kalo Shop trained and supported generations of designers, jewelers and silversmiths from its heyday from thecearly 1900s through the depression, until it finally closed in 1970. Originally formed in 1900 by Clara Barck (still unmarried at the time) and five other women graduates of the School of Art Institute of Chicago, the Kalo Shop was incorporated by Barck in 1905. Owned and directed by her, it was, as Darling noted in Chicago Metalsmiths, “the city’s most influential concern producing handwrought silver.” She served as its proprietor, manager, and guiding light until her retirement in 1939, when she moved to San Diego. In 1959, at the age of 91 years old, she gave the business to its remaining four employees.

Clara Barck was born in Ellenville, New York, in 1868. When she was ten, her family moved west to a farm in Oregon City, near Portland. After a stint as a weaver, business classes, and work in department stores in Portland and San Francisco, she moved to Chicago to study design at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From 1905 to 1916 she was married to George S. Welles, eventually filing for divorce. In 1916 she shocked the divorce court by asking for no alimony, offering the explanation that she was a business woman with a good income, while her husband had none.

A New Woman will be the first museum exhibition centered on the Kalo Shop, Clara Barck Welles, and her influence. In conjunction with the exhibition, a commissioned essay by Darcy L. Evon, author Hand Wrought Arts & Crafts Metalwork and Jewelry, 1890 – 1940, will outline Welles’s role as an artisan-entrepreneur and pioneering businesswoman, making a case for the Kalo Shop as   most important and influential center of American hand wrought silver.

Throughout the half-century of Welles’s tenure there, the Kalo Shop established a reputation for design and craft of the highest order, and for furthering the Arts and Crafts ethos in America. As the works in A New Woman demonstrate, Kalo Shop silver embodied the company’s motto, “beautiful, useful, and enduring.” Welles directed all operations, established a school to teach aspiring women artisans and designers, interviewed customers about their commissions, designed many Kalo Shop pieces, and always oversaw the exquisite quality of Kalo Shop production. She supported the individual creativity of her artisans, but insisted on “Kalo Shop” as the sole brand marking.

The shop served intentionally as a haven, mentorship and training facility for women artisans and recent immigrants seeking to establish themselves in the United States. Welles supported employees who wanted to start their own studios and businesses, which created a plethora of new jobs in design and craftsmanship industries. A number of her most skilled craftsmen and women did so, spreading the Kalo Shop’s influence from coast-to-coast. Reflecting this and the Kalo Shop’s stylistic impact on other silversmiths, A New Woman will include works from the Kalo Shop itself along with pieces by artisans such as David and Walter Mulholland, Julius Randahl, and Lebolt & Company, all whom either worked for Welles, or hired artisans who trained at the Kalo Shop. Together, the works on view will encompass a range of hollowware, flatware, and other pieces, demonstrating the remarkable and distinctive work of American Arts & Crafts silversmiths in the Chicago area during the first half of the 20th century.

At the center of the Kalo Shop was Clara Barck Welles herself, and her activities as an exemplar of the New Woman movement extended well beyond her role and noteworthy success as a woman entrepreneur and business executive. Recent research by silver scholar and curator Sharon S. Darling has documented Welles’s long record of activism on behalf of woman and immigrants and will be incorporated into the exhibition’s didactic texts and publication. As Darling has noted, Welles was a moving force in the progressive social movements of early 20th century Chicago, a highly active leader of the Women’s Suffrage Movement, and a colleague of other noted social reformers such as Jane Addams of Hull House, a center of immigrant support. Based on her activities as the chair of the publicity committee of the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association, Welles was selected to lead the Illinois delegation to the 1913 national march for Women’s Suffrage in Washington D.C. on the eve of Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration as president. The following June, Illinois became the first state east of the Mississippi to ratify women’s right to vote. Darling’s essay for A New Woman will recount this and other aspects of Welles’s life, linking them to her artistic and business success as head of the Kalo Shop.

Focusing on a select number of stellar works from the Kalo Shop and silversmiths in its orbit, and complementing the exhibition with scholarship on Clara Barck Welles’s larger career and social concerns, A New Woman – Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration and Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver will document an important chapter in the history of the American Arts and Crafts Movement. The well-illustrated exhibition publication will demonstrate the intrinsic quality of the works on view, and offer a fascinating window into the life of the uniquely gifted woman who was at their center. A New Woman – Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration and Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver is made possible at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art through generous donations supporting the museum. The exhibition and its installation design are being planned in collaboration with Marilyn Archer, Curatorial and Design Consultant, and Margo Grant Walsh, Consultant.

Aug 16
Braiding Sweetgrass Roundup

Done with Braiding Sweetgrass? Donate your copy of Braiding Sweetgrass for the next year's incoming freshman class.

Braiding Sweetgrass Roundup
May 26–September 20
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) 005 (Student Sustainability Center)

Done with Braiding Sweetgrass? Donate your copy of Braiding Sweetgrass for the next year's incoming freshman class.

Aug 16
Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People

Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People seeks to honor the past, present, and future of Native and Afro descendent peoples by restoring and reviving our relationship to one...
Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People
June 1–September 9
Knight Library Circulation Lobby

Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People seeks to honor the past, present, and future of Native and Afro descendent peoples by restoring and reviving our relationship to one another and to the natural world. Through holding and regarding kinship, solidarity, and community as sacred. By refusing the narratives of erasure, dehumanization, and subjugation. Finally, by envisioning a future rooted in Black Liberation and Indigenous Sovereignty!  

In partnership with UO Common Reading, Amber Starks (aka Melanin Mvskoke), University and Community stakeholders, and the University of Oregon Libraries, the Unceded Kinship art exhibition showcases Afro descendent and Native artists with connections to Oregon and their respective communities.  Unceded Kinship is a celebration of these artists contributions to the movements of Black Liberation and Indigenous Sovereignty and explores the ongoing conversations within and across Afro descendent and Native communities around decentering white supremacy and settler colonialism.  The exhibition personifies ways in which Native and Afro descendant peoples have built community and invested in kinship. 

The exhibition asserts that both movements are compatible technologies of resistance and futurity, and is a reminder that Native and Afro descendent peoples have always been the authors and architects of their liberation.  Ultimately, Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People affirms the future for both peoples outside of oppression and subjugation, a future envisioned and built for them, by them! 

For more information, visit the  UO Common Reading Unceded Kinship: Land, Place, and People webpage

Aug 16
João Incerti Exhibition 8:00 a.m.

The Visual Arts Team is excited to present João Incerti, an artist based in Brazil, displays his colorful and striking work at the Aperture gallery until September...
João Incerti Exhibition
June 24–September 8
8:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Aperture Gallery

The Visual Arts Team is excited to present João Incerti, an artist based in Brazil, displays his colorful and striking work at the Aperture gallery until September 8th!

Find the Visual Arts Team on Instagram @uovisualarts or Facebook @visualartsteam, where you can see exhibition updates, behind the scenes looks, and video artist talks!

Aug 16
Ugo Akabike - Caught Existing 8:00 a.m.

The Visual Arts Team is excited to present Ugo Akabike, a UO alum, showcases stunning black and white photography in his exhibition “Caught Existing” at the Adell...
Ugo Akabike - Caught Existing
June 24–September 8
8:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) Adell McMillan Gallery

The Visual Arts Team is excited to present Ugo Akabike, a UO alum, showcases stunning black and white photography in his exhibition “Caught Existing” at the Adell McMillan gallery. On view until September 8th.

Find the Visual Arts Team on Instagram @uovisualarts or Facebook @visualartsteam, where you can see exhibition updates, behind the scenes looks, and video artist talks!

Aug 16
Remember This: Hung Liu at Trillium 9:00 a.m.

In “Remember This: Hung Liu at Trillium” in the JSMA's Barker and Soreng galleries, renowned contemporary Chinese-American artist Hung Liu explored subjects...
Remember This: Hung Liu at Trillium
February 5–August 28
9:00 a.m.
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) Barker and Soreng Galleries

In “Remember This: Hung Liu at Trillium” in the JSMA's Barker and Soreng galleries, renowned contemporary Chinese-American artist Hung Liu explored subjects ranging from portraits to landscapes to still lifes and reflects upon history, memory, tradition, migration, and social justice.

Aug 16
Blue Star Museums 10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission to active-duty military personnel and veterans year-round. From Armed Forces Day through Labor Day, we are...
Blue Star Museums
May 21–September 4
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History offers free admission to active-duty military personnel and veterans year-round. From Armed Forces Day through Labor Day, we are proud to extend the offer of free admission to all military families (with ID) through the Blue Star Museums program! 

Aug 17
A New Woman: Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration & Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver

In the fall of 2021, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon will open A New Woman — Clara Barck Welles, Influence and Inspiration in Arts...
A New Woman: Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration & Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver
October 9–2
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

In the fall of 2021, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon will open A New Woman — Clara Barck Welles, Influence and Inspiration in Arts and Crafts Silver, focusing on the artistic work, career, and feminist social activism of one of the nation’s most noteworthy early 20th century artisans and entrepreneurs. Showcasing works in the collections of the JSMA and the Portland Art Museum, together with rarely exhibited pieces from select private collections, the show will be on view at the JSMA through October 2, 2022. It will be accompanied by a publication including essays by noted scholars of American Arts and Crafts metalwork, Sharon S. Darling and Darcy L. Evon.

Clara Barck Welles has long been recognized as the founder and owner of the Kalo Shop of Chicago, famous for its elegant Arts and Craft silver hollowware, flatware, and jewelry. Under her tutelage, the Kalo Shop trained and supported generations of designers, jewelers and silversmiths from its heyday from thecearly 1900s through the depression, until it finally closed in 1970. Originally formed in 1900 by Clara Barck (still unmarried at the time) and five other women graduates of the School of Art Institute of Chicago, the Kalo Shop was incorporated by Barck in 1905. Owned and directed by her, it was, as Darling noted in Chicago Metalsmiths, “the city’s most influential concern producing handwrought silver.” She served as its proprietor, manager, and guiding light until her retirement in 1939, when she moved to San Diego. In 1959, at the age of 91 years old, she gave the business to its remaining four employees.

Clara Barck was born in Ellenville, New York, in 1868. When she was ten, her family moved west to a farm in Oregon City, near Portland. After a stint as a weaver, business classes, and work in department stores in Portland and San Francisco, she moved to Chicago to study design at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From 1905 to 1916 she was married to George S. Welles, eventually filing for divorce. In 1916 she shocked the divorce court by asking for no alimony, offering the explanation that she was a business woman with a good income, while her husband had none.

A New Woman will be the first museum exhibition centered on the Kalo Shop, Clara Barck Welles, and her influence. In conjunction with the exhibition, a commissioned essay by Darcy L. Evon, author Hand Wrought Arts & Crafts Metalwork and Jewelry, 1890 – 1940, will outline Welles’s role as an artisan-entrepreneur and pioneering businesswoman, making a case for the Kalo Shop as   most important and influential center of American hand wrought silver.

Throughout the half-century of Welles’s tenure there, the Kalo Shop established a reputation for design and craft of the highest order, and for furthering the Arts and Crafts ethos in America. As the works in A New Woman demonstrate, Kalo Shop silver embodied the company’s motto, “beautiful, useful, and enduring.” Welles directed all operations, established a school to teach aspiring women artisans and designers, interviewed customers about their commissions, designed many Kalo Shop pieces, and always oversaw the exquisite quality of Kalo Shop production. She supported the individual creativity of her artisans, but insisted on “Kalo Shop” as the sole brand marking.

The shop served intentionally as a haven, mentorship and training facility for women artisans and recent immigrants seeking to establish themselves in the United States. Welles supported employees who wanted to start their own studios and businesses, which created a plethora of new jobs in design and craftsmanship industries. A number of her most skilled craftsmen and women did so, spreading the Kalo Shop’s influence from coast-to-coast. Reflecting this and the Kalo Shop’s stylistic impact on other silversmiths, A New Woman will include works from the Kalo Shop itself along with pieces by artisans such as David and Walter Mulholland, Julius Randahl, and Lebolt & Company, all whom either worked for Welles, or hired artisans who trained at the Kalo Shop. Together, the works on view will encompass a range of hollowware, flatware, and other pieces, demonstrating the remarkable and distinctive work of American Arts & Crafts silversmiths in the Chicago area during the first half of the 20th century.

At the center of the Kalo Shop was Clara Barck Welles herself, and her activities as an exemplar of the New Woman movement extended well beyond her role and noteworthy success as a woman entrepreneur and business executive. Recent research by silver scholar and curator Sharon S. Darling has documented Welles’s long record of activism on behalf of woman and immigrants and will be incorporated into the exhibition’s didactic texts and publication. As Darling has noted, Welles was a moving force in the progressive social movements of early 20th century Chicago, a highly active leader of the Women’s Suffrage Movement, and a colleague of other noted social reformers such as Jane Addams of Hull House, a center of immigrant support. Based on her activities as the chair of the publicity committee of the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association, Welles was selected to lead the Illinois delegation to the 1913 national march for Women’s Suffrage in Washington D.C. on the eve of Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration as president. The following June, Illinois became the first state east of the Mississippi to ratify women’s right to vote. Darling’s essay for A New Woman will recount this and other aspects of Welles’s life, linking them to her artistic and business success as head of the Kalo Shop.

Focusing on a select number of stellar works from the Kalo Shop and silversmiths in its orbit, and complementing the exhibition with scholarship on Clara Barck Welles’s larger career and social concerns, A New Woman – Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration and Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver will document an important chapter in the history of the American Arts and Crafts Movement. The well-illustrated exhibition publication will demonstrate the intrinsic quality of the works on view, and offer a fascinating window into the life of the uniquely gifted woman who was at their center. A New Woman – Clara Barck Welles, Inspiration and Influence in Arts & Crafts Silver is made possible at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art through generous donations supporting the museum. The exhibition and its installation design are being planned in collaboration with Marilyn Archer, Curatorial and Design Consultant, and Margo Grant Walsh, Consultant.

Aug 17
Braiding Sweetgrass Roundup

Done with Braiding Sweetgrass? Donate your copy of Braiding Sweetgrass for the next year's incoming freshman class.

Braiding Sweetgrass Roundup
May 26–September 20
Erb Memorial Union (EMU) 005 (Student Sustainability Center)

Done with Braiding Sweetgrass? Donate your copy of Braiding Sweetgrass for the next year's incoming freshman class.

Aug 17
Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People

Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People seeks to honor the past, present, and future of Native and Afro descendent peoples by restoring and reviving our relationship to one...
Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People
June 1–September 9
Knight Library Circulation Lobby

Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People seeks to honor the past, present, and future of Native and Afro descendent peoples by restoring and reviving our relationship to one another and to the natural world. Through holding and regarding kinship, solidarity, and community as sacred. By refusing the narratives of erasure, dehumanization, and subjugation. Finally, by envisioning a future rooted in Black Liberation and Indigenous Sovereignty!  

In partnership with UO Common Reading, Amber Starks (aka Melanin Mvskoke), University and Community stakeholders, and the University of Oregon Libraries, the Unceded Kinship art exhibition showcases Afro descendent and Native artists with connections to Oregon and their respective communities.  Unceded Kinship is a celebration of these artists contributions to the movements of Black Liberation and Indigenous Sovereignty and explores the ongoing conversations within and across Afro descendent and Native communities around decentering white supremacy and settler colonialism.  The exhibition personifies ways in which Native and Afro descendant peoples have built community and invested in kinship. 

The exhibition asserts that both movements are compatible technologies of resistance and futurity, and is a reminder that Native and Afro descendent peoples have always been the authors and architects of their liberation.  Ultimately, Unceded Kinship: Land, Place and People affirms the future for both peoples outside of oppression and subjugation, a future envisioned and built for them, by them! 

For more information, visit the  UO Common Reading Unceded Kinship: Land, Place, and People webpage

 

Past Public Affairs Speaker Series events

2021-22

Oct 28
Immigrant Oregon Panel Discussion7:00 p.m.

This event is subject to UO COVID guidelines; refer to the UO COVID-19 Resource page for more details. Please register for this event to be notified of any...
Nov 9
Citizenship Reimagined: Race, Immigration, and the New States' Rights6:00 p.m.

Join us in person or online for this event.  This event is subject to UO COVID guidelines; refer to the UO COVID-19 Resource page for more details. Please register for...

2020-21

Jul 28
Black Mental Health Matters4:00 p.m.

Watch live on Facebook At a moment of urgent racial reckoning, this program will explore the significance of Black mental health and ask what role it plays in the movement...
Oct 20
Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015)noon

Register for this free event   A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical...
Oct 29
Facts Still Matter: Countering the Influence of Russian Hackers, Trolls, and “Viral Deception"4:00 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org.  Register...
Nov 11
The State From Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University....

2019-2020

Nov 20
A Good Provider is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jason DeParle, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist. His new book, A Good Provider is One Who Leaves, tells the story of an unforgettable family as they...
Jan 23
Political Discussion Networks, Political Engagement, and the Latino Electorate4:00 p.m.

Featuring Marisa Abrajano, professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in...
Feb 5
Women Voters: Race, Gender, and Dynamism in U.S. Presidential Elections6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jane Junn, University of Southern California. Jane Junn is a professor of political science and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Southern...
Feb 27
How We Became Our Data: A Genealogy of the Informational Person6:30 p.m.

Featuring Colin Koopman, associate professor of philosophy and director of the New Media and Culture Program at the University of Oregon. His books include: Pragmatism as...
May 1
A Conversation w/ Robert Kuttner on Saving our Economic Future4:00 p.m.

Join us for an online discussion and Q&A with Robert Kuttner, co-founder of the Economic Policy Institute and current editor of The American Prospect. Kuttner was a longtime...

2018-19

Oct 11
Women and the 2018 Midterm Elections6:30 p.m.

Featuring E.J. Graff, senior fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism. Graff researches and reports on gender and sexuality issues and is a board...
Oct 25
War and the Media: 1960s to the Trump Era6:30 p.m.

Featuring Norman Solomon, journalist, activist, and author. Solomon is co-founder of RootsAction.org and founding director of the Institute for Public Accuracy,...
Nov 12
Game Change or More of the Same? Assessing the Midterm Election6:30 p.m.

A discussion featuring Alison Gash, UO Political Science; Margaret Hallock, Wayne Morse Center; Jeff Mapes, OPB; and Kerry Tymchuk, Oregon Historical Society. Alison Gash...
Feb 27
The Known Citizen: Exploring Privacy in Modern America6:30 p.m.

Featuring Sarah E. Igo, history professor, director of the American studies program, and faculty director of the E. Bronson Ingram College at Vanderbilt University. Igo's...
Mar 12
Rivalry and Reform: Presidents, Social Movements, & the Transformation of American Politics6:30 p.m.

Sidney Milkis, University of Virginia politics professor, and Dan Tichenor, Wayne Morse senior faculty fellow, will discuss their forthcoming book. 
Apr 18
Populism for the 1%: The Fall of the Republican Party and the Rise of Donald Trump6:30 p.m.

Featuring Paul Pierson, political science professor at UC Berkeley. His most recent books are The Transformation of American Politics: Activist Government and the Rise...
Apr 22
The U.​S.​ Economic Outlook: Do Deficits Matter?7:00 p.m.

The University of Oregon invites you to hear from guest speaker Keith Hall, director of the Congressional Budget Office, with remarks from Sarah Nutter, dean, Lundquist...
May 7
Hope in Challenging Times: How cities—and people—lead the way in tackling our toughest issues6:30 p.m.

Featuring Cecilia Muñoz, vice president for public interest technology and local initiatives at New America. Prior to joining New America, she served for eight...

2017-18

Feb 6
America First?: Isolationism and Global Engagement in Historical Perspective6:30 p.m.

Guest speaker Christopher Nichols is the director of the Oregon State University Center for the Humanities. Nichols specializes in history and its relationships with...
Apr 5
The Origins of Today’s Radical Right and the Crisis of Our Democracy6:30 p.m.

Guest speaker Nancy MacLean is an American historian and the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. Maclean’s research focuses on race,...
Apr 17
Black Lives Matter and American Racial Politics6:30 p.m.

Guest speaker Alvin Tillery is an associate professor and associate chair of political science and African American studies at Northwestern University. His interests include...

2016-17

Oct 25
Ready for Hillary? Gender & Media in the Presidential Campaigns6:30 p.m.

Featuring Regina Lawrence, nationally recognized authority on political communication, civic engagement, gender and politics, and the role of media in public discourse about...
Nov 15
Challenges for the New Administration7:00 p.m.

Featuring Robert Kuttner, cofounder and coeditor of The American Prospect. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week, and continues to write columns in...
Mar 8
Checks & Balances in the Age of Trump7:00 p.m.

How well does our constitutional democracy work when one party controls the levers of power and crucial rights are at stake?  This panel will try to answer this question...

2015-16

Jan 26
Access and Higher Education4:00 p.m.

Featuring UO President Michael Schill. Schill became the 18th president of the University of Oregon in 2015. He previously served as the dean and Harry N. Wyatt...
Feb 18
Racial Categories and Statistics: Can we achieve justice without them?6:30 p.m.

Featuring Kim Williams, Portland State University. An associate professor of political science at PSU, Williams also directs the Center for Women, Politics & Policy...
Apr 25
Calm Before the Storm: Oregon and National Campaigns at Halftime6:30 p.m.

Join us for a panel discussion featuring a great lineup of political experts: Betsy Boyd, Assoc. VP of Federal Affairs, University of Oregon. Before joining UO in 2000,...
May 23
Thunder on the Left and Right: Populism in the 2016 Elections6:30 p.m.

Series focused on the 2016 election. Join us as we explore the meaning and context behind the glitz and headlines in a dramatic election year. We’ll be...

2014-15

Oct 16
Surveillance, Suppression, and Secrecy7:00 p.m.

Featuring Nadine Strossen, former president of ACLU. Nadine Strossen is a professor of law at New York Law School. She served as president of the ACLU from 1991-2008 and is a...
Jan 20
The Revolt of the Cities: Transforming Urban Politics7:00 p.m.

Featuring Harold Meyerson, editor-at-large of The American Prospect and weekly columnist for The Washington Post. In 2009, he was named one of "the most...
Feb 5
His Own Received Him Not: Jimmy Carter, Progressive Evangelicalism, and the Religious Right7:00 p.m.

Featuring Randall Balmer, Dartmouth College; part of the Public Affairs Speaker Series.
Feb 10
Lessons in Leadership3:30 p.m.

Featuring Kerry Tymchuk, executive director of the Oregon Historical Society. Part of the Public Affairs Speaker Series.
Mar 10
We're Free, But Not *Free*: Custodial Citizenship in Our Time7:00 p.m.

Vesla Weaver is an assistant professor of political science and African American Studies at Yale University. She received her doctorate in Government and Social Policy at Harvard...

2013-14

Nov 14
Dollarocracy: The Money and Media Election Complex That is Destroying America7:00 p.m.

Featuring Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols, authors of Dollarocracy: The Money and Media Election Complex That is Destroying America. In addition to Dollarocracy, McChesney...
Feb 5
Toward More Perfect Unions: The Consequences and Possibilities of Marriage Equality4:00 p.m.

Featuring Beatrice Dohrn, Director Nonprofit Clinic, UO Law School, Alison Gash (UO Political Science), Ellen Herman (UO History). Part of the "We the People? From Seneca...
Mar 6
New Media, Race, and Participatory Politics: Democracy in the 21st Century5:00 p.m.

Featuring Distinguished Speaker Cathy Cohen, University of Chicago Department of Political Science. Cathy J. Cohen is the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political...