Events

Upcoming Events

Oct 29
Facts Still Matter: Countering the Influence of Russian Hackers, Trolls, and “Viral Deception"4:00 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org.  Register...
October 29 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org. 

Register for this free event

This talk is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics’ Public Affairs Speaker Series and the Center for Science Communication Research (SCR). It is made possible in part by the Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture Fund.  

Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the university’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the Association of American Publishers’ 2019 R.R. Hawkins Award and was published in a revised paperback edition by Oxford University Press in June 2020. Among her other award-winning books are Spiral of Cynicism (with Joseph Cappella) and The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (with Kate Kenski and Bruce Hardy). In 2020, the National Academy of Sciences awarded Jamieson its Public Welfare Medal for her “non-partisan crusade to ensure the integrity of facts in public discourse and development of the science of scientific communication to promote public understanding of complex issues.”

In 2003, Jamieson cofounded FactCheck.org, the non-profit non-partisan website that describes itself as a "consumer advocate for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics." In 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, and from 2014-2019, FactCheck won Webby Awards from the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences for being the best Politics site (the Webbys have been called the “Oscars of the Internet”).

Jamieson is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. For her contributions to the study of political communication, she received the American Political Science Association’s Murray Edelman Distinguished Career Award in 1995. In 2016, the American Philosophical Society awarded her its Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities.

Nov 11
The State From Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University....
November 11 4:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Register for this free event

Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research aims to better understand the causes and consequences of racial inequality in the United States, how state policies and institutions shape political life and identity, and especially the effects of increasing punishment and surveillance in America on democratic inclusion.

Weaver has served on the Harvard/NIJ Executive Session on Community Corrections, the Center for Community Change’s Good Jobs for All initiative, and the APSA Presidential Taskforce on Racial Inequality in the Americas.  In 2017, she was an Andrew Carnegie Fellow. She is currently working on a new book based on the Portals Policing Project.  

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. 

Register for the Zoom webinar here

Jan 14
Overcoming the Challenges of Communicating Emerging Science about COVID-19 with Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson4:00 p.m.

REGISTRATION COMING SOON.    Kathleen Hall Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of...
January 14 4:00 p.m.

REGISTRATION COMING SOON. 
 

Kathleen Hall Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the university’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the Association of American Publishers’ 2019 R.R. Hawkins Award and was published in a revised paperback edition by Oxford University Press in June 2020. Among her other award-winning books are Spiral of Cynicism (with Joseph Cappella) and The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (with Kate Kenski and Bruce Hardy). In 2020, the National Academy of Sciences awarded Jamieson its Public Welfare Medal for her “non-partisan crusade to ensure the integrity of facts in public discourse and development of the science of scientific communication to promote public understanding of complex issues.” Jamieson is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. For her contributions to the study of political communication, she received the American Political Science Association’s Murray Edelman Distinguished Career Award in 1995. In 2016, the American Philosophical Society awarded her its Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities.

 

Co-sponsored by the Center for Science and Communication Research, Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, and Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, this lecture is part of the School of Journalism and Communication’s annual Robert W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture series. This series brings professionals to the SOJC for thought-provoking lectures, workshops, and discussions about the thorny issues today’s journalists face, and is made possible by generous gifts from the Johnston family, George E. Jones of U.S. News and World Report, and the Correspondents Fund.

 

Past Events

Oct 7
The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for...
October 7 4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event

Alondra Nelson is president of the Social Science Research Council. She is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. She was previously a professor of sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science.

Nelson began her academic career on the faculty of Yale University and there was recognized with several honors, including the Poorvu Prize for interdisciplinary teaching excellence. An award-winning sociologist, Nelson has published widely-acclaimed books and articles exploring science, technology, medicine, and social inequality.

Nelson is author of several books, including The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, a finalist for the Hurston-Wright Foundation Award for Nonfiction, and a Wall Street Journal favorite book.

Nelson has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality and about the social implications of new technologies, including artificial intelligence, big data, and human gene editing. She serves on the boards of the Data & Society Research Institute, the Center for Research Libraries, and The Teagle Foundation, as well as the board for African-American programs at Monticello. She also is a member of the board of directors of the Brotherhood/Sister Sol, a Harlem-based youth development organization. Her essays, reviews, and commentary have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Science, Le Nouvel Observateur, The Boston Globe, and on National Public Radio, The New Yorker Radio Hour, and PBS Newshour, among other venues. 

This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 

Jul 28
Black Mental Health Matters4:00 p.m.

Watch live on Facebook At a moment of urgent racial reckoning, this program will explore the significance of Black mental health and ask what role it plays in the movement...
July 28 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Watch live on Facebook

At a moment of urgent racial reckoning, this program will explore the significance of Black mental health and ask what role it plays in the movement for Black lives. How have ideas about Black mental health and illness intersected with enduring associations between Blackness and criminality? What impact has the culture of incarceration had on the experiences of Black individuals with mental illness? How might Oregon's specific history of racial oppression and its tiny Black population contribute to the mental health challenges facing Black Oregonians right now?

Featuring Martin Summers, Department of History, Boston College; and Larissa Miller, PhD, Clinical Psychology Resident, Strong Integrated Behavioral Health, Eugene, OR.

Miller earned her doctorate in clinical child psychology from the University of Denver, where her research focused on unconscious bias and nonverbal communication. Dr. Miller provides evidence-based psychotherapy to individuals from childhood through young adulthood and is currently recruiting participants for a free support group for BIPOC youth.

Summers is a professor of history and African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College, where he regularly teaches courses on gender and sexuality in African American history, medicine and public health in the African diaspora, and the African diaspora and the world. Summers’ most recent book, Madness in the City of Magnificent Intentions: A History of Race and Mental Illness in the Nation’s Capital, is a social and cultural history of medicine which focuses on African American patients at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, a federal mental institution in Washington, D.C., from its founding in 1855 to the 1980s.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics in partnership with Eugene-Springfield NAACP, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, and University of Oregon Division of Equity and Inclusion.

Jun 25
Immunity Passports: Pandemic Privilege or Biological Discrimination?  4:00 p.m.

  As governments around the world seek paths toward reopening their economies and away from the "social distancing" restrictions that have been imposed in order...
June 25 4:00 p.m.

 

As governments around the world seek paths toward reopening their economies and away from the "social distancing" restrictions that have been imposed in order to control the spread of covid-19, immunity passports have been proposed as one solution. Françoise Baylis and Natalie Kofler will discuss and answer questions about the many ethical, practical, and scientific challenges posed by immunity passports and other types of state-sanctioned health checks.

 

Françoise Baylis is a philosopher whose innovative work aims to move the limits of mainstream bioethics and develop more effective ways to understand and tackle public policy challenges. Baylis brings her ethical sensibilities, informed by best practices, theory and common sense, to a wide range of public issues. She is a frequent guest on CBC and Radio Canada and the author of many news stories with a “behind the scenes” look at ethical issues. Her current research focuses on heritable human genome modification, the body economy, assisted human reproduction, and research involving women. She will serve as the 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair.

 

Natalie Kofler is a molecular biologist and founding director of Editing Nature at Yale University, a global initiative to steer responsible development and deployment of environmental genetic technologies. She also serves as an adviser for the Scientific Citizenship Initiative, Harvard Medical School. Natalie’s work navigates the technical, ecological, and ethical complexity of gene editing applications designed to impact wild species, such as CRISPR-edited mosquitos to prevent malaria transmission, genetic strategies to eliminate invasive species, or the use of CRISPR gene editing to promote species resiliency to changing climates.

May 1
A Conversation w/ Robert Kuttner on Saving our Economic Future4:00 p.m.

Join us for an online discussion and Q&A with Robert Kuttner, co-founder of the Economic Policy Institute and current editor of The American Prospect. Kuttner was a longtime...
May 1 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
online

Join us for an online discussion and Q&A with Robert Kuttner, co-founder of the Economic Policy Institute and current editor of The American Prospect. Kuttner was a longtime columnist for BusinessWeek, and continues to write columns for Huffington Post, the Boston Globe, and the New York Times international edition. He has been writing extensively about averting economic catastrophe during and after the coronavirus pandemic.


Moderated by Dan Tichenor, Philip H. Knight Professor of Social Science at the UO Department of Political Science and director of the Wayne Morse Center’s Program for Democratic Governance. Part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. 
Free; registration required. Spaces are limited.

Mar 11
CANCELED: Communicating the Trustworthiness of Science with Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson5:00 p.m.

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with...
March 11 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with compromised immune systems, the organizers feel it is in the best interest to reschedule this particular set of events for a later date. We apologize for any inconvenience these cancelations may cause you. 

 

Different UO events may have different expectations for the risk to their speakers and audiences, and we are evaluating each one on a case-by-case basis. The University of Oregon is coordinating with Lane County Public Health, the Oregon Health Authority, and federal health officials to proactively monitor and respond to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to protect the health and well-being of our campus community. For more information on how the university is responding and how to prevent exposure, please visit the UO coronavirus webpage.

Mar 10
CANCELED: Russian hackers, trolls and #DemocracyRIP7:00 p.m.

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with...
March 10 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with compromised immune systems, the organizers feel it is in the best interests to reschedule this particular set of events for a later date. We apologize for any inconvenience these cancelations may cause you.  

Different UO events may have different expectations for the risk to their speakers and audiences, and we are evaluating each one on a case-by-case basis. The University of Oregon is coordinating with Lane County Public Health, the Oregon Health Authority, and federal health officials to proactively monitor and respond to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to protect the health and well-being of our campus community. For more information about how the university is responding and how to prevent exposure, please visit the UO coronavirus webpage.

Mar 10
Climate Town Hall: Organizing for Environmental Justice6:30 p.m.

This town hall features a panel on local environmental equity issues, followed by breakout groups that focus on how climate activists can engage with local environmental justice...
March 10 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Campbell Community Center

This town hall features a panel on local environmental equity issues, followed by breakout groups that focus on how climate activists can engage with local environmental justice issues. Together, we will share resources, identify and organize next steps to take together.

Childcare provided. If you need childcare, please email info@350eugene.org.

Made possible in part by a grant from the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics.

 

Feb 27
How We Became Our Data: A Genealogy of the Informational Person6:30 p.m.

Featuring Colin Koopman, associate professor of philosophy and director of the New Media and Culture Program at the University of Oregon. His books include: Pragmatism as...
February 27 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 110

Featuring Colin Koopman, associate professor of philosophy and director of the New Media and Culture Program at the University of Oregon. His books include: Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty (2009); Genealogy as Critique: Foucault and the Problems of Modernity (2013); and How We Became Our Data: A Genealogy of the Informational Person (2019). His essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times and Aeon as well as in academic journals such as Critical Inquiry, Contemporary Political Theory, Diacritics, and New Media & Society.

Presented by the Wayne Morse Center’s Program for Democratic Governance.  Cosponsored by the UO Department of Philosophy and Oregon Data Science.

Feb 20
LERC Presents: A Labor Black History Month Event with April Sims3:00 p.m.

April Sims, the Secretary-Treasurer of the Washington State Labor Council, is the first woman of color and the first black person to be elected as a WSLC executive...
February 20 3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center





April Sims, the Secretary-Treasurer of the Washington State Labor Council, is the first woman of color and the first black person to be elected as a WSLC executive officer.

 









In this talk, Sims will explore the concept of intersectionality through the lens of personal narrative, intergenerational reflections on working-class experiences that shaped her political consciousness as a woman and as a black person, and the ways in which those anecdotes directly informed her life as a unionist and leader in the labor movement. She will also share her experiences and observations regarding social and economic justice views on the current political economy of collective bargaining. Learn more.

Co-sponsored by:

Black Studies Program
Center for the Study of Women in Society
Sociology Department
Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, and the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation (GTFF)




Feb 5
Women Voters: Race, Gender, and Dynamism in U.S. Presidential Elections6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jane Junn, University of Southern California. Jane Junn is a professor of political science and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Southern...
February 5 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Featuring Jane Junn, University of Southern California.

Jane Junn is a professor of political science and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Southern California. She is an expert on voting, political participation, public opinion, Asian American politics, gender and politics, racial and ethnic identity, and the politics of immigration in the United States. She is the author of five books, including The Politics of Belonging: Race, Immigration, and Public Opinion and Education and Democratic Citizenship in America. Her research on the intersection of gender, race, and voting has been widely cited by journalists and political commentators in the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center as part of its Democratic Governance Speaker Series. Cosponsored by the UO Center for the Study of Women in Society and UO Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 

Jan 24
Disasters, Resilience, and the Next Generation12:30 p.m.

A Lecture on Lifeline Infrastructure and Community Resilience as part of the Le Val Lund Award. Featured speaker: Yumei Wang P.E., Resilience Engineer at Oregon Department of...
January 24 12:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

A Lecture on Lifeline Infrastructure and Community Resilience as part of the Le Val Lund Award.
Featured speaker: Yumei Wang P.E., Resilience Engineer at Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
Followed by a panel discussion with:

John DeWenter, Board Chair, Springfield Utility Board
Jeni Hall, Solar Project Manager, Energy Trust of Oregon
Mike Harryman, State Resilience Officer for Oregon
Moderated by Josh Bruce, Director, Oregon Partnership for Disaster Resilience.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics; cosponsored by Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and UO Safety and Risk Services. Part of the Wayne Morse Center's 2019-21 theme, Science, Policy, and the Public.

Free and open to the public.

Jan 23
Political Discussion Networks, Political Engagement, and the Latino Electorate4:00 p.m.

Featuring Marisa Abrajano, professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in...
January 23 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Featuring Marisa Abrajano, professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests are in American politics, particularly in developing ways to increase politics participation and civic engagement amongst racial/ethnic minorities. Her most recent book is White Backlash: Immigration, Race and American Politics (with Zoltan Hajnal, 2015). 

Nov 20
A Good Provider is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st Century6:30 p.m.

Featuring Jason DeParle, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist. His new book, A Good Provider is One Who Leaves, tells the story of an unforgettable family as they...
November 20 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Featuring Jason DeParle, two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist.

His new book, A Good Provider is One Who Leaves, tells the story of an unforgettable family as they endure years of sacrifice and separation, willing themselves out of shantytown poverty into a new global middle class. Migration is changing the world–reordering politics, economics, and cultures across the globe. With nearly 45 million immigrants in the United States, few issues are as polarizing. But if the politics of immigration is broken, immigration itself—tens of millions of people gathered from every corner of the globe—remains an underappreciated American success.

Jason DeParle is a senior writer at The New York Times and a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine. Previously he served as a domestic correspondent in Washington for The Times. Prior to joining The Times, Mr. DeParle was an editor at The Washington Monthly since 1987.

A Democratic Governance Speaker Series event, sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center and the UO School of Journalism and Communication. 

 

Nov 6
Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive, An evening with New York Times best-selling author Stephanie Land6:30 p.m.

Stephanie Land’s bestselling debut memoir Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive recounts her harrowing saga as a single mom navigating the...
November 6 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

Stephanie Land’s bestselling debut memoir Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive recounts her harrowing saga as a single mom navigating the poverty trap. Her unflinching and inspiring testimony exposes the physical, economic, and social brutality that domestic workers face, all while radiating a parent’s hope and resilience.

At age 28, Land’s dream of attending college and becoming a writer are deferred when a summer fling turns into an unplanned pregnancy. After facing domestic abuse, and lacking any form of reliable safety net, she checks into a homeless shelter with her 7-month-old daughter. She begins the bureaucratic nightmare of applying for food stamps and subsidized housing, and starts cleaning houses for $9/hour. Mired in patronizing government processes and paltry wages, Land illustrates the trauma of grasping for stability from a rigged system, and demonstrates how hard work doesn’t always pay off.

After years of barely scraping by, Land graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Montana in 2014, and started a career as a freelance writer. She writes about economic and social justice, domestic abuse, chronic illness, and motherhood, and has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Vox, Salon, and many other outlets. She’s worked with Barbara Ehrenreich at the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, and is a writing fellow at the Center for Community Change.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center’s Margaret Hallock Program for Women’s Rights. Cosponsored by the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion, Center for the Study of Women in Society, Department of Sociology, and Labor Education and Research Center. 

Nov 4
Judge Torres7:00 p.m.

An immigrant. A dreamer. A survivor. This is the story of Xiomara Torres. Milta Ortiz’s Judge Torres recounts the inspiring story of one of Oregon’s finest...
November 4 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Berwick Hall, Tykeson Rehearsal Hall

An immigrant. A dreamer. A survivor. This is the story of Xiomara Torres. Milta Ortiz’s Judge Torres recounts the inspiring story of one of Oregon’s finest judges, woven together with magic realism and Mayan folktales from her home of El Salvador.

Many thanks to our co-sponsors:


Latinx Scholars ARC / UO Housing
School of Music & Dance
Law School
Theatre Arts
Wayne Morris Center
Romance Languages
Indigenous, Race, & Ethnic Studies
EC Brown Foundation
Latinx Strategies Group



 


 

Oct 29
How the Arts are Addressing the Climate Crisis - an evening of discussion and performance7:00 p.m.

This event features three short performances (musical, theatrical, and poetic) followed by a roundtable discussion on the role of artists and art in addressing the climate...
October 29 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, Room 175

This event features three short performances (musical, theatrical, and poetic) followed by a roundtable discussion on the role of artists and art in addressing the climate emergency and building individual and collective resilience.

Roundtable participants:
Wayne Morse Chair and viola da gamba player Dr. Lucy Jones
painter Naeemeh Naeemaei 
Theresa May (UO Theater Arts)
Emily Scott (UO History of Art and Architecture and Environmental Studies)
John Witte (UO English)

Part of the Wayne Morse Center’s 2019-21 inquiry into Science, Policy and the Public.

Free and open to the public

 

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