Events

Upcoming Events

Mar 12
Cressman Lecture: "Can Science Be Saved?"noon

During the COVID-19 pandemic, public debates about the validity of scientific findings and the value of science overall have intensified, as some Americans have actively resisted...
March 12 noon

During the COVID-19 pandemic, public debates about the validity of scientific findings and the value of science overall have intensified, as some Americans have actively resisted and even denied the legitimacy of scientific guidance about how to address the disease. What are the social and psychological drivers of public skepticism about science? How can skeptics be convinced otherwise? According to Naomi Oreskes, professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, people won’t be persuaded with more science or more facts. They deny scientific findings because they do not like the implications of their veracity—what Oreskes terms “implicatory denial.”

To convince deniers, their fears and ideologies must be addressed. Some Americans hold a worldview that prioritizes the inviolability of individual rights and the sanctity of the economy above all else, and adhere to an ideology of “limited government.” Oreskes contends, “This runs very, very deep in American culture. It ties into an extraordinary individualism that you don’t generally see in other places in the world. We tend to be more resistant to collective action in the United States than people in other countries. And it ties into this very, very deep idea in American culture that the government that governs best governs least.”

Naomi Oreskes will explore the complexities of Americans’ denial of scientific findings and skepticism about science in her 2020–21 Cressman Lecture “Can Science Be Saved?”  via Zoom.

As Oreskes explains, “Many Americans think that we face a general crisis of trust in science. With the rejection of mask-wearing by many Americans—as well as many of our political leaders—it is easy to come to that conclusion. But evidence shows that the vast majority of Americans do, in fact, trust science.  Scientists (along with doctors and nurses) remain among the most respected and trusted figures in American life. However, Americans do distrust and reject science in particular areas, and we know something about why that is: Americans reject scientific findings and advice when they dislike their implications. Often this involves a perceived threat to our individual freedoms and personal liberties, or to strongly held beliefs. In the COVID-19 crisis, irresponsible political leaders fomented the idea that asking a person to wear a mask was asking them to give up their freedom. This, of course, was preposterous; wearing a mask is little more than an inconvenience. Still, because the question of mask-wearing has become entangled with the question of personal choice, solving it will not be a matter of giving people more or better information.  This means that scientists will have to accept that asking people to trust science is more than a matter of asking them to accept facts; it is also a matter of ethics, morality, and citizenship.”

Oreskes is a leading public intellectual on the role of science in society, the reality of anthropogenic climate change, and on anti-scientific disinformation campaigns. She has written numerous books including Discerning Experts (2019), Why Trust Science? (2019), and Science on a Mission: American Oceanography from the Cold War to Climate Change (2020), and the forthcoming The Magic of the Marketplace: The True History of a False Idea with Erik Conway. 

Oreskes’s lecture is free and open to the public. Registration is required to participate in the live Zoom event. The talk will be recorded and available for viewing on the OHC’s YouTube channel. For more information, contact ohc@uoregon.edu.

Apr 29
The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome, with Alondra Nelson1:00 p.m.

Alondra Nelson was recently nominated by President Joe Biden as the Office of Science and Technology deputy director for science and society. She is president of the...
April 29 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Alondra Nelson was recently nominated by President Joe Biden as the Office of Science and Technology deputy director for science and society. She is president of the Social Science Research Council and is also the Harold F. Linder Chair and Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry. She was previously a professor of sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science.

Nelson is author of several books, including The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome. She has contributed to national policy discussions on inequality and about the social implications of new technologies, including artificial intelligence, big data, and human gene editing. 

This event is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as a part of its 2019-21 theme of inquiry, Science, Policy, and the Public. It is part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 

Register for this free event.

 

Past Events

Feb 24
Labor in the 21st Century: A Labor Black History Event5:00 p.m.

In this conversation, Rev. Terry Melvin will expound on the concepts of solidarity and racial justice through the lens of personal narrative. His working-class experiences shaped...
February 24 5:00 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

In this conversation, Rev. Terry Melvin will expound on the concepts of solidarity and racial justice through the lens of personal narrative. His working-class experiences shaped his political consciousness as a life-long leader in the labor movement. As President of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, he recognizes that collective bargaining laws advance worker and racial justice. Most importantly, his faith guides his actions towards humanity and his efforts to build a strong labor movement.

Cosponsored by the University of Oregon:
Black Studies Program, Center for the Study of Women in Society, Sociology Department, and Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics

Feb 22
Building on the Code: How Genetic Technologies Benefit Biomedical Research and Human Health1:00 p.m.

Join the Knight Campus and Wayne Morse Chair Françoise Baylis for a discussion on the many benefits genetic technologies are having on today’s biomedical research and...
February 22 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Join the Knight Campus and Wayne Morse Chair Françoise Baylis for a discussion on the many benefits genetic technologies are having on today’s biomedical research and what promises it holds for human health. Dr. Baylis will be joined by panelists Calin Plesa (Assistant Professor, Knight Campus), Shoukhrat Mitalipov (Professor and Director of the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, OHSU), and Chris Gemmiti (Executive Director of Technical Operations, CRISPR Therapeutics) for a dynamic conversation followed by audience Q & A.

Zoom Webinar 

Bios:


Moderator Françoise Baylis - 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair Françoise Baylis is a bioethicist and university research professor at Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia. A philosopher whose innovative research in bioethics lies at the intersection of policy and practice, she challenges readers to think broadly and deeply about the direction of health, science and biotechnology. Her work aims to move the limits of mainstream bioethics and develop more effective ways to understand and tackle public policy challenge. Baylis' most recent book is Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing (Harvard University Press, 2019). Baylis brings her ethical sensibilities, informed by best practices, theory and common sense, to a wide range of public issues. She is a frequent guest on CBC and Radio Canada and the author of many news stories with a “behind the scenes” look at ethical issues. Her current research focuses on heritable human genome modification, the body economy, assisted human reproduction, and research involving women. With a personal mantra to make the powerful care, Baylis contributes to national policy-making via government research contracts, membership on national committees and public education. This work – all of which is informed by a strong commitment to the common good – focuses largely on issues of social justice. Baylis is a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Nova Scotia, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. In 2017 she was awarded the Canadian Bioethics Society Lifetime Achievement Award. She has been named to "Who's Who in Black Canada" (2002–present).


 


Panelist Calin Plesa – Calin Plesa is an Assistant Professor in the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact at the University of Oregon. He received a BASc in Engineering Physics from Simon Fraser University, MSc in Nanoscience from Chalmers University of Technology, and a PhD from Delft University of Technology in Bionanoscience. As an HFSP Fellow in the Kosuri lab at UCLA he developed DropSynth, a low-cost scalable method to synthesize thousands of genes. Calin holds a CASI award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and started his lab at the University of Oregon in 2019. The Plesa lab focuses on accelerating the pace at which we understand and engineer biological protein-based systems. Towards this end, it develops new technologies for gene synthesis, multiplex functional assays, in-vivo mutagenesis, and genotype-phenotype linkages for a number of different research areas and applications. These enable access to the huge sequence diversity present in natural systems as well as testing of rationally designed hypotheses encoded onto DNA at much larger scales than previously possible.


 


Panelist Shoukhrat Mitalipov – Shoukhrat Mitalipov is a Director of the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy of Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). He is also a Professor in the Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences at Oregon National Primate Research Center, OHSU. Dr. Mitalipov earned his Ph.D. degree in Developmental & Stem Cell Biology from Research Center for Medical Genetics in Moscow, Russia. He came to Utah State University in 1995 to conduct his postdoctoral research in stem cell and developmental biology and moved to OHSU in 1998. Dr. Mitalipov’s research interest is to understand the mechanisms of cytoplasmic control of nuclear genome identity and reprogramming of somatic cells to the totipotent and pluripotent states. Another objective is to develop novel germline gene therapy approaches for the treatment of inherited human diseases. Dr. Mitalipov is know for his leading discoveries in producing human patient-matched embryonic stem cells using somatic cell nuclear transfer. His team has also pioneered gene therapy approaches that prevent transmission of genetic defects in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes to future generations.


 


Panelist Chris Gemmiti – Dr. Gemmiti has dedicated his 20+ year career to cell therapy and regenerative medicine, through both industry and academic roles. He is currently the Executive Director of Technical Operations at CRISPR Therapeutics. This includes multiple candidates in the Hemoglobinopathy, Immuno-oncology and Regenerative Medicine franchises. He was most recently the Senior VP of Operations at Sentien, a clinical-stage MSC company. He held a key role in opening and executing Sentien’s IND for COVID-19 patients experiencing multi-organ failure. Chris joined Sentien from Harvard’s Wyss Institute, where he guided translation strategy and technical development of early-stage regenerative medicine technologies. Previously, at Organogenesis Inc., he was the business unit Director responsible for the clinical development, FDA approval (2012), and commercial launch of GINTUIT™, the first manufactured allogeneic cell therapy approved by BLA. He holds a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Georgia Tech and BS in BME from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Gemmiti has served on Advisory Boards at Georgia Tech, Johns Hopkins, Duke University, TERMIS, Cell Therapy Bioprocessing and Alliance for Regenerative Medicine.

Feb 17
Can Science Make Sense of Life? with Sheila Jasanoff1:00 p.m.

Register for this free online event.  Sheila Jasanoff is a professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School. Her work explores the role of science...
February 17 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Register for this free online event. 

Sheila Jasanoff is a professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School. Her work explores the role of science and technology in the law, politics, and policy of modern democracies. A pioneer in her field, she has authored more than 130 articles and chapters and is author or editor of more than 15 books.

This talk is based on and shares a title with Jasanoff’s most recent book, which explores the dramatic authority accorded to the biological sciences and biotechnology in the genomic age. She explores flashpoints in law, politics, ethics, and culture to argue that science’s promises to edit, or even rewrite, the texts of life to correct nature’s mistakes have gone too far.

Commentary by Andrew Nelson, Randall C. Papé Chair in Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Lundquist College of Business, and Associate Vice President, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, University of Oregon; and Françoise Baylis, bioethicist and university research professor at Dalhousie University and Wayne Morse Chair. 

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as part of its Science, Policy, and the Public theme of inquiry. Cosponsored by the Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact.

Feb 16
The History and Future of Scientific Racism and Eugenics Panel Discussion1:00 p.m.

This panel will consider the enduring legacy of eugenics alongside the possibilities that genetic technologies now offer for understanding population histories, diverse and...
February 16 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

This panel will consider the enduring legacy of eugenics alongside the possibilities that genetic technologies now offer for understanding population histories, diverse and diasporic ancestries, and race- and gender-based health disparities.

Panelists:

Alexandra Minna Stern is a professor of history, American culture and women's and gender studies as well as associate dean for the humanities at the University of Michigan. She is the author of  Telling Genes: The Story of Genetic Counseling in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012) and Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate: How the Alt-Right Is Warping the American Imagination (Beacon, 2020). 

Jada Benn Torres is an associate professor of anthropology and the director for the Laboratory of Genetic Anthropology and Biocultural Studies at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Torres' research explores genetic ancestry and population history of African and Indigenous Caribbean peoples. She also studies women’s health disparities, with a specific focus on the uterine fibroids among women of African descent. Her most recent book is Genetic Ancestry: Our Stories, Our Pasts (Routledge, 2020).

Moderator: Judith Eisen, Professor of Biology and Wayne Morse Center Distinguished Scholar.

Commentary by Françoise Baylis, 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair. 

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics as part of its Science, Policy, and the Public theme of inquiry. Cosponsored by the UO Department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies; and the UO Black Studies Program and Minor. 

Register here for the free Zoom event. 

Feb 10
Designer Babies: All You Ever Wanted to Know (and More) with Françoise Baylis 1:00 p.m.

Register here Françoise Baylis, 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair, is a bioethicist and university research professor at Dalhousie University, Nova...
February 10 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Register here

Françoise Baylis, 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair, is a bioethicist and university research professor at Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia.  A philosopher whose innovative research in bioethics lies at the intersection of policy and practice, she challenges readers to think broadly and deeply about the direction of health, science and biotechnology. Her work aims to move the limits of mainstream bioethics and develop more effective ways to understand and tackle public policy challenges. Baylis' most recent book is Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing (Harvard University Press, 2019).

Baylis is a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Nova Scotia, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. In 2017 she was awarded the Canadian Bioethics Society Lifetime Achievement Award. She has been named to "Who's Who in Black Canada" (2002–present). 

This is the annual Wayne Morse Chair Public Address and is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Science, Policy, and the Public theme of inquiry. It is cosponsored by the UO Department of Philosophy; Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and the Center for the Study of Women in Society. 

Jan 14
Overcoming the Challenges of Communicating Emerging Science about COVID-19 with Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson4:00 p.m.

REGISTER HERE: https://sojc.link/jamieson Using the debate over the safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 as a case study, this talk will...
January 14 4:00 p.m.

REGISTER HERE: https://sojc.link/jamieson

Using the debate over the safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 as a case study, this talk will explore ways to communicate the nature of emerging science to the press and public in polarized times and make the case for the need to more cogently communicate the standards that govern assessment of the quality of scientific evidence.

Kathleen Hall Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the university’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, which won the Association of American Publishers’ 2019 R.R. Hawkins Award and was published in a revised paperback edition by Oxford University Press in June 2020. Among her other award-winning books are Spiral of Cynicism (with Joseph Cappella) and The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (with Kate Kenski and Bruce Hardy). In 2020, the National Academy of Sciences awarded Jamieson its Public Welfare Medal for her “non-partisan crusade to ensure the integrity of facts in public discourse and development of the science of scientific communication to promote public understanding of complex issues.” Jamieson is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. For her contributions to the study of political communication, she received the American Political Science Association’s Murray Edelman Distinguished Career Award in 1995. In 2016, the American Philosophical Society awarded her its Henry Allen Moe Prize in the Humanities.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Science and Communication Research, Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, and Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, this lecture is part of the School of Journalism and Communication’s annual Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture series. This series brings professionals to the SOJC for thought-provoking lectures, workshops, and discussions about the thorny issues today’s journalists face, and is made possible by generous gifts from the Johnston family, George E. Jones of U.S. News and World Report, and the Correspondents Fund.

Nov 11
The State From Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities4:00 p.m.

Register for this free event Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University....
November 11 4:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Register for this free event

Vesla Weaver is the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research aims to better understand the causes and consequences of racial inequality in the United States, how state policies and institutions shape political life and identity, and especially the effects of increasing punishment and surveillance in America on democratic inclusion.

Weaver has served on the Harvard/NIJ Executive Session on Community Corrections, the Center for Community Change’s Good Jobs for All initiative, and the APSA Presidential Taskforce on Racial Inequality in the Americas.  In 2017, she was an Andrew Carnegie Fellow. She is currently working on a new book based on the Portals Policing Project.  

This event is part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. 

Register for the Zoom webinar here

Oct 29
Facts Still Matter: Countering the Influence of Russian Hackers, Trolls, and “Viral Deception"4:00 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org.  Register...
October 29 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Featuring Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania and cofounder of FactCheck.org. 

Register for this free event

This talk is sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics’ Public Affairs Speaker Series and the Center for Science Communication Research (SCR). It is made possible in part by the Richard W. and Laurie Johnston Lecture Fund.  

Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the university’s Annenberg Public Policy Center. She has authored or co-authored 16 books, including Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President. Among her other award-winning books are Spiral of Cynicism (with Joseph Cappella) and The Obama Victory: How Media, Money and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (with Kate Kenski and Bruce Hardy). In 2020, the National Academy of Sciences awarded Jamieson its Public Welfare Medal for her “non-partisan crusade to ensure the integrity of facts in public discourse and development of the science of scientific communication to promote public understanding of complex issues.”

In 2003, Jamieson cofounded FactCheck.org, the non-profit non-partisan website that describes itself as a "consumer advocate for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics." 

Jamieson is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the International Communication Association. 

Oct 20
Defending Democracy: A Conversation with Eric H. Holder, Jr., 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009-2015)noon

Register for this free event   A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical...
October 20 noon

Register for this free event  

A leading progressive voice, Eric Holder has been instrumental in shaping the direction of the United States on a number of critical issues at the intersection of law and policy. He served in the Obama Administration as the 82nd Attorney General of the United States (2009 to 2015), the third longest serving Attorney General in U.S. history and the first African American to hold that office. A staunch advocate for civil rights and voting rights, Holder is active in gerrymandering reform as Chair of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee. He is a partner at Covington & Burling LLP, in Washington, D.C. 

This event is the keynote for the Wayne Morse Center's 20th Anniversary Celebration and is sponsored by the Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. It's part of the African American Workshop and Lecture Series, which is sponsored by the Office of the President and coordinated by the Division of Equity and Inclusion. It is also part of the Lorwin Lectureship on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. It is cosponsored by the UO Political Science Department; the UO School of Law; the UO Division of Equity and Inclusion; and KLCC, public radio.

Jul 28
Black Mental Health Matters4:00 p.m.

Watch live on Facebook At a moment of urgent racial reckoning, this program will explore the significance of Black mental health and ask what role it plays in the movement...
July 28 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Watch live on Facebook

At a moment of urgent racial reckoning, this program will explore the significance of Black mental health and ask what role it plays in the movement for Black lives. How have ideas about Black mental health and illness intersected with enduring associations between Blackness and criminality? What impact has the culture of incarceration had on the experiences of Black individuals with mental illness? How might Oregon's specific history of racial oppression and its tiny Black population contribute to the mental health challenges facing Black Oregonians right now?

Featuring Martin Summers, Department of History, Boston College; and Larissa Miller, PhD, Clinical Psychology Resident, Strong Integrated Behavioral Health, Eugene, OR.

Miller earned her doctorate in clinical child psychology from the University of Denver, where her research focused on unconscious bias and nonverbal communication. Dr. Miller provides evidence-based psychotherapy to individuals from childhood through young adulthood and is currently recruiting participants for a free support group for BIPOC youth.

Summers is a professor of history and African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College, where he regularly teaches courses on gender and sexuality in African American history, medicine and public health in the African diaspora, and the African diaspora and the world. Summers’ most recent book, Madness in the City of Magnificent Intentions: A History of Race and Mental Illness in the Nation’s Capital, is a social and cultural history of medicine which focuses on African American patients at Saint Elizabeths Hospital, a federal mental institution in Washington, D.C., from its founding in 1855 to the 1980s.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics in partnership with Eugene-Springfield NAACP, Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center, and University of Oregon Division of Equity and Inclusion.

Jun 25
Immunity Passports: Pandemic Privilege or Biological Discrimination?  4:00 p.m.

  As governments around the world seek paths toward reopening their economies and away from the "social distancing" restrictions that have been imposed in order...
June 25 4:00 p.m.

 

As governments around the world seek paths toward reopening their economies and away from the "social distancing" restrictions that have been imposed in order to control the spread of covid-19, immunity passports have been proposed as one solution. Françoise Baylis and Natalie Kofler will discuss and answer questions about the many ethical, practical, and scientific challenges posed by immunity passports and other types of state-sanctioned health checks.

 

Françoise Baylis is a philosopher whose innovative work aims to move the limits of mainstream bioethics and develop more effective ways to understand and tackle public policy challenges. Baylis brings her ethical sensibilities, informed by best practices, theory and common sense, to a wide range of public issues. She is a frequent guest on CBC and Radio Canada and the author of many news stories with a “behind the scenes” look at ethical issues. Her current research focuses on heritable human genome modification, the body economy, assisted human reproduction, and research involving women. She will serve as the 2020-21 Wayne Morse Chair.

 

Natalie Kofler is a molecular biologist and founding director of Editing Nature at Yale University, a global initiative to steer responsible development and deployment of environmental genetic technologies. She also serves as an adviser for the Scientific Citizenship Initiative, Harvard Medical School. Natalie’s work navigates the technical, ecological, and ethical complexity of gene editing applications designed to impact wild species, such as CRISPR-edited mosquitos to prevent malaria transmission, genetic strategies to eliminate invasive species, or the use of CRISPR gene editing to promote species resiliency to changing climates.

May 1
A Conversation w/ Robert Kuttner on Saving our Economic Future4:00 p.m.

Join us for an online discussion and Q&A with Robert Kuttner, co-founder of the Economic Policy Institute and current editor of The American Prospect. Kuttner was a longtime...
May 1 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
online

Join us for an online discussion and Q&A with Robert Kuttner, co-founder of the Economic Policy Institute and current editor of The American Prospect. Kuttner was a longtime columnist for BusinessWeek, and continues to write columns for Huffington Post, the Boston Globe, and the New York Times international edition. He has been writing extensively about averting economic catastrophe during and after the coronavirus pandemic.


Moderated by Dan Tichenor, Philip H. Knight Professor of Social Science at the UO Department of Political Science and director of the Wayne Morse Center’s Program for Democratic Governance. Part of the Wayne Morse Center's Public Affairs Speaker Series. 
Free; registration required. Spaces are limited.

Mar 11
CANCELED: Communicating the Trustworthiness of Science with Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson5:00 p.m.

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with...
March 11 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Redwood Auditorium

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with compromised immune systems, the organizers feel it is in the best interest to reschedule this particular set of events for a later date. We apologize for any inconvenience these cancelations may cause you. 

 

Different UO events may have different expectations for the risk to their speakers and audiences, and we are evaluating each one on a case-by-case basis. The University of Oregon is coordinating with Lane County Public Health, the Oregon Health Authority, and federal health officials to proactively monitor and respond to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to protect the health and well-being of our campus community. For more information on how the university is responding and how to prevent exposure, please visit the UO coronavirus webpage.

Mar 10
CANCELED: Russian hackers, trolls and #DemocracyRIP7:00 p.m.

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with...
March 10 7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
William W. Knight Law Center, 175

The UO-sponsored events on March 10 and 11 featuring Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson are canceled. Considering CDC advisories for older adults and those with compromised immune systems, the organizers feel it is in the best interests to reschedule this particular set of events for a later date. We apologize for any inconvenience these cancelations may cause you.  

Different UO events may have different expectations for the risk to their speakers and audiences, and we are evaluating each one on a case-by-case basis. The University of Oregon is coordinating with Lane County Public Health, the Oregon Health Authority, and federal health officials to proactively monitor and respond to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to protect the health and well-being of our campus community. For more information about how the university is responding and how to prevent exposure, please visit the UO coronavirus webpage.

Mar 10
Climate Town Hall: Organizing for Environmental Justice6:30 p.m.

This town hall features a panel on local environmental equity issues, followed by breakout groups that focus on how climate activists can engage with local environmental justice...
March 10 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.
Campbell Community Center

This town hall features a panel on local environmental equity issues, followed by breakout groups that focus on how climate activists can engage with local environmental justice issues. Together, we will share resources, identify and organize next steps to take together.

Childcare provided. If you need childcare, please email info@350eugene.org.

Made possible in part by a grant from the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics.

 

 

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