Wayne Morse Chair of Law and Politics

photo of Terry FisherWilliam “Terry” Fisher

Fisher is director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and Hilmer Hale Professor of Intellectual Property Law at Harvard Law School. While at UO, he will assist with a law school class on intellectual property during fall 2013. In winter 2014, Professor Fisher hosted REWIRED: How Technology and Law Shape Social Progress.

 

 

Speakers

picture of Cathy CohenCathy Cohen

Cathy J. Cohen is the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago where she also served as the director of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture. She is the author of Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press 2010) and The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University of Chicago Press, 1999).

 

photo of Kelly MathesonKelly Matheson

Kelly Matheson is a senior program manager for WITNESS. In addition, she is an attorney, human rights activist and filmmaker.

 

 

 

photo of Bob McChesneyRobert McChesney

Robert McChesney is a professor at the University of Illinois who focuses on the history and political economy of communication. He is also the author of Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy.

 

 

photo of John NicholsJohn Nichols is the Washington correspondent for The Nation and a frequent radio and tv commentator on politics and media issues. His books include The Genius of Impeachment and the best-selling biography of Vice President Dick Cheney, Dick: The Man Who is President.

 

 

 

photo of Michele NorrisMichele Norris

Michele Norris is a host of NPR’s All Things Considered and the author of The Grace of Silence: A Memoir. She is the founder of the Race Card Project, which encourages conversation about race and identity.

 

 

photo of madhavi sunderMadhavi Sunder

Madhavi Sunder is a leading scholar in law and culture, with a special interest in intellectual property and human rights law. She is the Thelton E. Henderson Visiting Scholar-in-Residence at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law in 2013. Her book, From Goods to a Good Life: Intellectual Property and Global Justice, was published in 2012.

 

 

Resident Scholars

Eric Priest – Resident Scholar in Law

Eric Priest is an assistant professor of law specializing in intellectual property law and responses to new technology. He continued his research on Copyright, Media and Democracy in China. Priest has been at the UO since 2009. He was a resident fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, where he researched internet content filtering in Asia for the OpenNet Initiative. He also worked in China as the CEO of Noank Creative Internet Technologies.

Professor Priest co-taught a fall 2013 class on Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property Law with 2013 Wayne Morse Chair of Law and Politics William “Terry” Fisher.  The class examined emerging issues that are important to lawyers and practitioners of new media. He also convened a symposium on Copyright and Media Pluralism in China.

Colin Koopman – Resident Scholar in Philosophy

Colin Koopman, assistant professor in philosophy, specializes in political theory with a focus on the history and future of the politics of information. He worked on his third book, titled Infopolitics:Transformations of Public and Private. Koopman has been at the UO since 2009. His previous books are Pragmatism as Transition and Genealogy as Critique. He received funding for a new class on “Internet, Society and Philosophy” and a Rippey Innovative Teaching Award for “Justice Matters” with Wayne Morse Senior Faculty Fellow Dan Tichenor. He was featured in A Philosopher Ponders the Virtual Public Sphere in UO’s CASCade Magazine. Koopman worked with the Wayne Morse Center to hold REWIRED: How Technology and Law Shape Social Progress  in January 2014.

Project Grant Recipients

  • Huerto de la Familia for “The Harvest Film Festival,” featuring films that focus on the interconnected immigrant rights movement and food justice movement.
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism Ed Madison for an after-school Digital Citizens Multimedia Course at Roosevelt High School in Portland.
  • Project REconomy to conduct surveys of how rural Latino homeowners access resources and information, especially via new media and the internet, related to foreclosure relief programs and making such information available to them.
  • Race Card Project at UO for a public lecture and panel on the intersections of race, media and democracy featuring NPR host Michele Norris.
  • UO Libraries to preserve and digitize the films in the Wayne Morse Papers Special Collection and University Archives, culminating in a public screening of select films.
  • Kim Goodwin and Trey Wilkins for seed money to develop a proposal for a documentary on the community rights movement in Oregon.

 

Events

Current Litigation Issues in Intellectual Property

Thursday, September 5, 2013, 12:30 p.m.

175 Knight Law Center

Featuring 2013-14 Wayne Morse Chair Terry Fisher. Cosponsored with the Oregon Law Career Center.


Fashion, Drugs and Music: How Law Affects Innovation

Friday, September 6, 2013, 11:45 a.m.

Vistas Ballroom, 12th Floor Eugene Hilton

A City Club of Eugene event featuring 2013-14 Wayne Morse Chair Terry Fisher.


The Race Card Project featuring Michele Norris

November 13, 2013, 7 p.m.

Erb Memorial Ballroom

Michele Norris is a host of NPR’s All Things Considered and the author of The Grace of Silence: A Memoir. She is the founder of the Race Card Project, which encourages conversation about race and identity. Part of the University of Oregon’s Identity Project. Cosponsored with UO Student Affairs and the Center on Diversity and Community.


Dollarocracy: The Money and Media Election Complex That is Destroying America

Thursday, November 14, 2013, 7 p.m.

175 Knight Law Center

Featuring Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols, authors of Dollarocracy: The Money and Media Election Complex That is Destroying America.

Robert McChesney is a professor at the University of Illinois who focuses on the history and political economy of communication. He is also the author of Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy. John Nichols is the Washington correspondent for The Nation and a frequent radio and tv commentator on politics and media issues. His books include The Genius of Impeachment and the biography of Vice President Dick Cheney, Dick: The Man Who is President.


rewired-backgroundREWIRED: How Law and Technology Shape Social Progress

January 21-22, 2014

Knight Law Center and Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Ford Lecture Hall

This symposium examines the role of law and technology in promoting creativity, security, self-determination and wellbeing. The symposium is hosted by 2013-14 Wayne Morse Chair Terry Fisher. More information and symposium schedule


Civil_Liberties_Online_web_4_They’re Watching Us/We’re Watching Them: Civil Liberties Online

Monday, March 10, 2014, 10 a.m.

Knight Library Browsing Room

Government and corporate entities are collecting information about you online, on the phone, at the library and in the public square. Sponsored by the UO Libraries, UO Department of Philosophy and the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, this event is designed to inform the public about what is being done at the national, state and local levels to protect informational civil liberties and how you can better preserve your personal privacy.


virtualjustice_250x100Visual Justice: Democratized Video as Evidence

Thursday, April 24, 5 P.M.

110 Knight Law Center

How can video documentation of injustices, such as cell phone videos, be used as evidence in court and other forums for human rights advocacy? Learn from examples in Syria and other locations across the globe where video has been used to secure prosecutions of the guilty or exonerations of the innocent.

Kelly Matheson is Senior Attorney and Program Manager for WITNESS, an international human rights organization that specializes in using video to support change in human rights practice, policy and law. Matheson is an attorney, filmmaker and human rights activist. She also is a 1999 alumna of the University of Oregon School of Law.

Cosponsored by Cinema Pacific and the Good Works Film Festival.


FORBIDDEN VOICES: A documentary by Barbara Miller

Saturday, April 26, 1 p.m.

Bijou Art Cinemas 429 E. 13th Ave. Eugene

Watch the trailer

Forbidden Voices accompanies three brave young cyberfeminists as they risk their lives to challenge their governments. Eyewitness reports and clandestine footage show Yoani Sánchez’s brutal beating by Cuban police for criticizing her country’s regime on her blog, Generación Y; Chinese human rights activist Jinyan under house arrest for four years; and Iranian journalist and women’s advocate Farnaz Seifi forced into exile, where she blogs under a pseudonym. Tracing each woman’s use of social media to denounce and combat violations of human rights and free speech in her home country, Forbidden Voices attests to the Internet’s potential for building international awareness and political pressure. Part of the Cinema Pacific Film Festival.